The best China travel stories from around the net

by James Weir
Posted: October 23rd, 2011 | Updated: January 9th, 2012 | Comments
China travel features_china travel news_china travel blogs_china travel stories Photo by Terence Lau We read a lot about travel over the course of one week and, after much sifting and sorting, we've rounded up a few of our favorites. From news and reviews to great blog posts, unusual destinations and travel stories, read on for our picks. >>> In light of some of the more distressing news that's coming out of China these days, I've decided to kick off this week's best of the net with some good (I mean, c'mon. Look at that picture. Just look at it. Don't you feel better already?). Yunnan, he helped lay foundations for homes in an earthquake prone region, made some friends and had a fantastic time. I guess there's something to be said for choosing to do good deeds in gorgeous locations. Keeping with the theme of all things good, our next pick of the week delves into the world of food. Delicious food. And though the article begins with a rather gruesome description of fish gasping for air (water?), their innards pulsing, do push on, dear reader; for the article takes a decidedly delicious turn, discussing some of the best food in Hong Kong and Macau, touching on both the marquee hits and the little known hole-in-the-wall gems. Also, there is a discussion of traditional Mongolian sheep slaughter. I don't want to give anything away, but it may or may not involve crushing the heart with your bare hands. May or may not. Everyone knows the look of a Chinese tour group: fantastic headgear, unintelligible loudspeakers, matching vests, flags etc., but few foreigners can claim to have spent a holiday as a member of one. I know of two: one is Hainan province news, the visa-free entry policy has been expanded to include five new nations—check the link to see the details. And in Loch Ness Monster news (yes, you read that correctly), it seems that Scottish tourism officials are wooing a Chinese delegation in hopes of spurring a Tian Chi's equally impossible to prove rumors of underwater stirrings. For tennis fans in Shanghai, October is truly a glorious month. In addition to the weather breaking (which gives tennis enthusiasts a chance to play a few hours without looking as though they accidentally stepped into the path of a fire hose), October is the month of the Shanghai Rolex Masters. I was lucky enough to spend more than a few days there, and I happily enjoyed the sparsely populated grounds and grandstands. The same cannot be said, though, for those that were hoping to one day see China host a Grand Slam tournament, as the prospect was significantly dimmed in light of lackluster attendance throughout the week. Though the author of the story exaggerates how empty the stands were (I'd say the Center Court was two thirds full at the final, and though not ideal for event organizers, that's certainly not empty when you consider it seats 15,000 people), I would guess that building the stadium an hour-and-a-half away from the center of the city (unless, of course, you had to transfer subway lines before catching the shuttle or a taxi, and then you could easily push two hours), and not within walking distance from any subway station might have had something to do with it. But for those of us who made it out, what a glorious week it was. Until next year!
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